Salmon are Sacred

 

Salmon Confidential from Twyla Roscovich on Vimeo.

There are five things you can do if the content of this film has convinced you that things must change:

  1. Donate to help us get this film in front of as many people as possible before the BC election. With your help, we can make the changes needed to protect the wild salmon of BC http://www.gofundme.com/FishFeedlotsOut
  2. Write to Adrian Dix, the leader of the BC NDP who is currently high in the polls, as we close in on the May 14, 2013 provincial election. Tell him you take salmon issue and the viruses seriously and his removing these salmon feedlots from the wild salmon migration routes would get your vote. His email is adrian.dix.mla@leg.bc.ca
  3. Use this link to Sign the petition and send it to Christy Clark, the Premier of British Columbia – or send her a letter directly at premier@gov.bc.ca
  4. Go to http://www.salmonfeedlotboycott.com/ and join the BOYCOTT
  5. Share this film with everyone you know so they will better understand the negative relationship between salmon feedlots and wild salmon, forests, whales, and the British Columbia economy.

Please take action.

Fish Farms: Good vs Bad

While this is a hot topic right now in the pacific north west, this topic is something that we all feel very strong about here at Clayoquot Wilderness Resort. It has been said over and over – NO MORE FISH FARMS in Clayoquot Sound. Clayoquot is a delicate ecosystem and many do not want to disrupt the already delicate life cycle any more than it already has been.

I sat down with John Caton, Managing Director, of Clayoquot Wilderness Resort to discuss this hot topic and was pleasantly surprised to hear that we stood the same ground: It’s not that fish farms are evil or bad and that wild salmon is good, it’s a matter of open containment farming vs. closed containment farming that is the more important topic. Farms bring employment to communities on so many levels – farmers, scientists, divers, mechanics and so many more and lets not forget the worlds want for this delectable fish. If it weren’t for the farms, our wild salmon might be in the same plight as the worlds shark population! If you haven’t already watched Sharkwater, it’s a must! Although the decline of these species is for different reasons, decline from human hand remains the same.

Some points to note when considering farmed vs. wild salmon is that both fish carry disease that is detrimental to the other. With this alone, does it not make sense to have each fish protected from the other that can harm it? There are a few farms, Marine Harvest, that have caught on to this way of thinking and for that, we salute you!

Until the day comes where true sustainable farming happens with all involved, we will stand by the petitions to help the voice that stands for no more farms. We will help fight the fight for sustainable fishing practices and will always stand behind the fight for wild salmon.

 

Chinook Salmon Forum in Tofino

Clayoquot Wilderness Resort is very active in the preservation of our local rivers and salmon stocks. This is one of our most important advocacies and passions here at the Resort for the reason that salmon is one of the most important keystone species in the ocean.

Wild salmon provide food for our ecosystem and it’s animals i.e.: bears, eagles and wolves. Each of these animals feed on the salmon that run up river. Once completed, they drag the carcass’ into the forest which in turn breaks down and creates the largest natural fertilizer in the world.  It is through this breakdown that we are able to have such healthy forests.

When you visit us here at Clayoquot Wilderness Resort you will have an opportunity to walk in the woods, ride up to old growth forest and to see the result of the circle of life that the salmon help to generate.  Read this great article about the life cycle of salmon: www.salmoncity.net

Camille MacIntosh, Office Manager and Environmental Monitor, was able to attend a meeting in Tofino recently where the protection of our local wild Chinook Salmon was being discussed. Attendees included; the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Doug Palfry who works with Tofino Hatchery, Berry Cortecito who works with Ecosystem Management, Friends of Clayoquot Sound and Carol Schmidt from Omega Pacific Hatchery as well as stakeholders from the local native communities were all present for this important meeting.

We care about the ocean, the forest, the wildlife and all living things and want to see it be here for the next generation.  Please consider not buying farmed salmon and you will be personally helping to preserve this very delicate life cycle.